Deconstructing the Village Green

We had two weird dreams overlapping each other last night.

They sort of mixed together badly like oil whipped into a cup of water.

In one layer, the dream that was most like the oil, we were playing a game of Sentinels of the Multiverse with a custom deck, and we kept getting this card that let us discard cards in order to build up a protective bonus that was massive, like -100 damage taken. Which, of course, made our character nigh invincible, but meant that we couldn’t do much of anything because we’d discard all of our cards every turn. And we’d periodically come back to our turn, and the same play would happen almost as if we weren’t choosing it. And then our girlfriend Jasmine would ask us how our deck was doing and we’d talk about the issues of the mechanics. Then proceed with the other dream for a bit before this would pop up again sometime later.

And the other dream, the metaphorical cup of water, was more long and drawn out than we’re going to describe here. Essentially, though, it was the unfolding discovery of how the managers/owners of the Village Green in Fairhaven, in Bellingham, our home town, had decided to demolish all of Fairhaven for reconstruction by building this weird pile driver thing in the Village Green that caused a repetitive earth quake. And everyone in the neighborhood came to watch it happen from inside the buildings that were coming down!

We spent the last part of that dream running around with bricks and concrete falling down around us, looking for safety while everyone else just stood around talking and cheering.

It didn’t really feel like a nightmare, though. More like an exercise in remembering some sort of frustration.

Dreams like this always feel more like artistic morality plays put on by our inworld crew for everyone’s entertainment and education, or therapy, rather than any sort of tour of what our inworld is actually like. Which probably means that’s exactly what they are.

We do have other dreams that are very clearly tours of our inworld, because they start with that premise overtly, like, “And here is what one of our schools is like.”

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